Highlights from the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting – Joy

  Last updated August 10, 2017 at 3:09 pm

Topics:  

We asked a bunch of young scientists who received the Lindau Nobel Laureate Fellowship to be our field reporters at The 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings in Germany. In this report, Joy writes about her highlights from the visit.


Before the meeting


Credit: Julia Nimke / Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings


The Lindau Nobel Laureate meeting is a week-long, cross-cultural and intergenerational encounters. This year, there will be 30 Nobel Laureates and 430 early career researchers from over 70 countries gathering at this event. “For the young scientists, this meeting is an once-in-a-lifetime experience”, described on the programme, “the extraordinary Lindau spirit creates lasting personal connections and professional networks”.  On the train to Lindau, I am a bit nervous yet excited about the upcoming week.


The scientific part of the program includes Laureate seminars and discussions sessions. Lectures held by the Nobel Laurates start from 9am in the morning. Although there was no Q&A session, each Nobel lecture has a corresponding discussion session in the afternoon, for young scientists to participate and ask both scientific and general questions. Master classes and poster sessions give opportunities to young scientists to present their work and get feedback from peers and Laureates.


The social part of the program includes morning exercises, science breakfasts, social dinners and a cruise trip to Mainau Island. We will have plenty of time making friends with like-minded people and exploring what others are doing on the other side of the world. There is also an interesting start-up pitch to encourage entrepreneurship.


Our Australian Delegation team is composed of nine young scientists, including Andrew G, Andrew W, Jess, JJ, Matthew, Michael, Siddu, Vini and myself. Prior to this Lindau Nobel Laureate meeting, the Science at the Shine Dome event held in Canberra provided us an opportunity of getting to know each other. Two of us are PhD candidates and the rest are postdoctoral researchers. There are five nationalities within the group, including Australia, India, Mauritius, New Zealand, USA and China. We are from different universities and research centres across Australia working in very different areas across chemistry, physics, engineering, biochemistry and nanomaterials. In addition to a nice blend of research interests, personalities and cultural backgrounds, we share the passion for science.


Who will we meet? What will we discuss? Will we get enough sleep? These are the questions wondering in my head. The journey will soon start.


During the meeting


The Nobel Lecture series started on the morning of Monday, 26th June. The style of lectures vary significantly from Laureate to Laureate. Some give a brief overview of their scientific challenges and achievement overtime, some raise global issues and strategies to resolve them, and others tell a life-time story and provide us advice of how to become a successful researcher.


Panel discussion sessions are great for young scientists to ask follow-up questions after the lectures. What is the impact of receiving a Nobel Prize? How to achieve a career-life balance? And what was the biggest challenge or turning point of your career? Hearing Laureates answering these questions have broadened my horizon. I remember hearing Laureates telling “my student came up with a better idea than mine”, “I’m in my 70s and I enjoy working in the lab – experiments keep my mind stimulated”, “although I said no to my student’s proposal, he worked hard to prove me wrong and eventually convinced me that he was right”. I respect their humbleness before and after being acknowledged for their significant scientific contribution, as well as their openness to new ideas and the attitude of forever learning and overcoming new challenges.


During morning tea and lunch breaks, I met people coming from different continents, at different stages of their studies and career. We discussed about the science from Laureate lectures, such as climate change and single-molecule microscopy. We also discussed general topics such as cultural exchange and career options. At several occasions, the Australian Academy of Science has organised the team to chat with Laureates, including Prof. Feringa, Prof. Chalfie, Prof. Schrock, Prof. Lehn and Prof. Yonath. We are also honoured to have Prof. Walker and Prof. Deisenhofer to join us for an academic dinner on Tuesday evening, with our Australian team as well as African delegates.



What I’ve learnt from my peers is that people have their uniqueness and strengths. We may have been the top of our cohort but there is always someone that is more talented in a different way. Emotional intelligence is certainly important to communicate with others, to work together and to achieve further. What I’ve learnt from Nobel Laureates is that there is no short cut to any success. We see the glory of achievement but we often neglect the challenges faced and effort made behind the story.


Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, Bayer Foundation: Science Pitch, Nana Bar


Bayer Foundations organised a start-up pitch on the evening of Wednesday 28th June. This is a great opportunities for researchers, who have an idea or a technology for commercialisation. After intense preparation at late nights, JJ and myself presented our pitches at the event and received valuable advice from investors. A special thank you to my Australian teammates for their support throughout this trip. This is one of many occasions in which we bond to become a great team!


Young scientists have actively participating, organising and leading events over the week. One of our Australian delegate, Siddu, was selected to be on the penal of the “Current and Future Game Changers in Chemistry” discussion. The audience can post questions via the Lindau Nobel app as well as making any follow-up comments directly. Climate change, energy storage and the role of computational chemistry in scientific discoveries are hot topics.


Credit: Christian Flemming/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, BASF World Café


I put my hand up for volunteering at the BASF science breakfast as a discussion facilitator. On Thursday morning, over 80 young scientists, 3 Nobel Laureates and a team of BASF staff have actively discussed the concept of “Circular Economy”, which is an alternative to a traditional linear economy of make, use and dispose. Our group focused on the design factor, from a green synthetic route of materials to a user friendly product, followed by a feasible recycling and regenerating process. We did some creative drawing and constructed a flowchart filled with chemical knowledge.


On the last day of the meeting, we took a cruise trip to the Mainau Island, which is about 1.5 hours away from Lindau. After a picnic lunch on the island, we had few hours exploring this beautiful place with flowers, waterfalls, churches, animal farms, a royal palace and a butterfly house.


After the meeting


Although it has been an intense week, I wish I could stay with this great team of people a bit longer. I have met so many intelligent people, both intellectually and emotionally, and I have so much to learn from them. This trip has indeed inspired me to believe in what I am passionate about, to make persistent effort, to be open-minded and to work collaboratively. Many young scientists including myself has made valuable friendship as well as professional partnership during his trip. Goodbye Lindau. We are looking forward to hearing each other’s success stories in the near future.


Did you like this blog? Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram to get all the latest science.




About the Author

Joy Jiang
Haihui Joy Jiang is a PhD candidate at the University of Sydney, working with Prof. Gregory G. Warr on the nanostructure of complex fluids. Joy’s interdisciplinary research projects lie among theoretical, physical, material, organic and biological Chemistry. She is passionate to establish three bridges, between her research and its potential applications; between scientific fields such as colloid science and bio-refinery; and between science and industry, as significant scientific contributions often address real-life challenges. In 2017, Joy received the AAS-SIEF fellowship to attend the 67th Lindau Nobel Laurate Meeting in Germany.

Published By

Science and technology is as much a part of our cultural fabric as art, music, theatre and literature. They play a significant role in our daily lives, yet, in a world dependent on science, we often take them for granted. Australia’s Science Channel believes every citizen has a right, and a responsibility, to be informed, and our mission is to create programs to bring that about.


Featured Videos

Placeholder
James Cameron talks science
Placeholder
In Class With.....David Suzuki - The Environment
Placeholder
In Class With.....David Suzuki - Career
Placeholder
Sustainable water use with Doug Green
Placeholder
Why is Indigenous science important?
Placeholder
Vanessa Pirotta - Using drones to collect whale snot (FameLab Australia 2018 Winner)
Placeholder
Toby Hendy - Poking Plants (FameLab Australia 2018 Runner-Up)
Placeholder
Muthu Vignesh Vellayappan - Groovy Patches (FameLab Australia 2018 Audience Choice)
Placeholder
Taryn Laubenstein - The Tail of Two Fishes
Placeholder
Richard Charlesworth - Coeliac disease diagnosis can be a pain in the posterior
Placeholder
Pegah Maasoumi - Solar Windows
Placeholder
James Wong - Breathing while you hop: How do kangaroos do it?
Placeholder
Ben McAllister - The ORGAN Experiment: Shining a light on dark matter
Placeholder
Mortaza Rezae - Empowering beautiful minds
Placeholder
Zane Stromberga - Can allergy drugs beat bladder disease?
Placeholder
Working In.....Art - Astrophotography
Placeholder
What's the best way to move - springs or muscles?
Placeholder
FameLab Australia Semi-Final Highlights
Placeholder
Saving lives with platypus milk
Placeholder
How Australia's politicians see our future in space
Placeholder
Keeping satellites in the loop
Placeholder
Tim Flannery talks about COP
Placeholder
Tim Jarvis & Tim Flannery talk Climate Change
Placeholder
Andy's Week in Science - robo baby, university rankings, and cancer on circadian rhythms
Placeholder
From chocolate factory to surgery - the milliDelta robot
Placeholder
Andy's Week in Science: video games, low tech transition windows and a new CRISPR technique
Placeholder
Science lessons useful in Art Restoration career
Placeholder
Are drones the future of racing?
Placeholder
The future of esports according to the experts
Placeholder
Seeing is believing with artist Eugenie Lee
Placeholder
The human impace of Art Science collaboration
Placeholder
Follow your Interests in Robotics
Placeholder
Zoz on 3D Printing
Placeholder
Flavia Tata Nardini on women in engineering
Placeholder
Flavia Tata Nardini on the future of the internet
Placeholder
Explore the ocean floor and Antarctic biodiversity
Placeholder
Follow your interests in Medical Research
Placeholder
Artists on Science
Placeholder
What is Space Archaeology?
Placeholder
Follow your Interests
Placeholder
Scientists on Art
Placeholder
3D Printing in Medical Research
Placeholder
Ethical Issues
Placeholder
Problem Solving - Robotics at Dermatec
Placeholder
Problem Solving with CSI
Placeholder
Tamarah King - Earthquake Geologist
Placeholder
True or False with Bajo and Rad BONUS ROUND
Placeholder
True or False with Bajo & Rad
Placeholder
Andy's Week in Science - Cats vs Dogs
Placeholder
FameLab 2018 - Get Involved!
Placeholder
Nural Cokcetin - How FameLab changed my life
Placeholder
Erinn Fagan-Jeffries - How FameLab changed my life
Placeholder
Noushin Nasiri - How FameLab changed my life
Placeholder
Ronald Yu - How FameLab changed my life
Placeholder
Alan Duffy's Top 5 Science Communication Tips
Placeholder
A Judge's Top Tips for FameLab Australia
Placeholder
Brain Candy - Why, Why, Why Michael Stevens?
Placeholder
The Past, Present, and Future of Malaria
Placeholder
This is a video of poo pills being made!
Placeholder
Mind Games - Sports Psychology
Placeholder
Fuel to Win - Sports Nutrition
Placeholder
Fifty years since Australia beat the world to space
Placeholder
ECR Network: Talk Your Science with Alan Duffy
Placeholder
Andy's Week in Science - chimps, klompen, and clouds
Placeholder
Our robot medicine future - heart huggers and micro biohybrids
Placeholder
Six Awkward Cancer Questions
Placeholder
How do you tell if a whale is left-handed?
Placeholder
She Flies - Turning Girls into Drone Pilots
Placeholder
Andy's Week in Science - Magnetic Fabric, Cancer Treatments, and Echolocation
Placeholder
The Science of Sexuality
Placeholder
Sailing Through Space with Bill Nye
Placeholder
Using Sports Science to Help Olympic Athletes
Placeholder
Three and a Half Minutes of Top Shelf Career Advice
Placeholder
New Space Tech with Andrea Boyd
Placeholder
Kelly Meets the Mars Curiosity Rover
Placeholder
Hearts, Opera, and Tough Conversations - Andy's Week in Science
Placeholder
Bill Nye on Science, Girls, and Saving the World!
Placeholder
2017 Prime Minister's Prizes for Science Part 2
Placeholder
2017 Prime Minister's Prizes for Science Part 1
Placeholder
Who Decides the Law in Space?
Placeholder
Scientists Watch Collision That Created Gravitational Waves
Placeholder
Getting Cold Feet Leads to a Whole New Career
Placeholder
ECR Network - Why Every Scientist Should Be on Twitter - The Benefits
Placeholder
ECR Network - Why Every Scientist Should Be On Twitter - The Fears
Placeholder
Live Podcast - Life Vs Science
Placeholder
Origami Robots, Babies, and Kidneys - Andy's Week in Science
Placeholder
Namira Salim and the Zero-G Peace Summit
Placeholder
Elon Musk's Mars Plan: Expert Analysis
Placeholder
SPACE AF - Thursday
Placeholder
My Time in Space
Placeholder
IAC TV Daily Broadcast - Wednesday
Placeholder
SPACE AF - Wednesday
Placeholder
IAC TV Daily broadcast - Tuesday
Placeholder
SPACE AF - Tuesday
Placeholder
IAC TV daily broadcast - Monday
01:00:41
Placeholder
SPACE AF - Monday
Placeholder
Live from IAC 2017
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Technology Rewrites History
Placeholder
Methamphetamine - Gateway Drug to Parkinson's Disease
Placeholder
Concussion, 3D BioPrinting, and The Universe - Andy's Week in Science
Placeholder
Pulsars, Clearwigs, and Pacemakers - Andy's Week in Science
Placeholder
Revolutions - The Quest to Transform HPV Racing
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Hurricane Irma Blows Away Tesla's Rip Off
Placeholder
Experts React to Alcohol Industry Concealing Cancer Links
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - The Limit of Your Lifespan
Placeholder
The Recipient
Placeholder
Think Like a Scientist: Natural Selection in an Outbreak
Placeholder
The End of Snow
Placeholder
The Next Rembrandt
Placeholder
The Discarded
Placeholder
The Spectators
Placeholder
Test Tube Babes
Placeholder
Pangolins in Peril- A Story of Rare Scales
Placeholder
Rock Art Project
Placeholder
Pork.0
Placeholder
OWSIA (Darkened Water)
Placeholder
Nex
Placeholder
Northern Quolls
Placeholder
Dish Life
Placeholder
At Street Level
Placeholder
Custom Love
Placeholder
Adrift
Placeholder
A Story from Space
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - The Most Dangerous Thing in Boxing May Be the Gloves
Placeholder
ECR Network 2017 – Get Interdisciplinary!
01:27:00
Placeholder
Chris Hadfield: The Future of Space Exploration
Placeholder
Chris Hadfield: Life After Space
Placeholder
Chris Hadfield: Life in Space
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Let's Make Algae Australian of the Year
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Australia's Energy Showdown
Placeholder
Nine Awkward Astrophysicist Questions
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - There's No Such Thing as an Exercise Pill
Placeholder
National Science Week Awards Show
Placeholder
ECR Network 2017 - Grant Writing Workshop
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Your 5 Step Asteroid Success Plan
Placeholder
National Science Week Forecast
Placeholder
Open Doors. Open Future. Open Day.
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Lose a Little to Gain Millions
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Crowd Sourcing Origami Astronaut Protection
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - T-Rex's Prehistoric Power Walk
Placeholder
True or False with Kale Brock
Placeholder
The Grandfather Paradox
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - The Hidden Heroes Tackling Mozzies
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Emergency AI Assistance
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Frogs Forever, Dinosaurs Never!
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Australia, Let's Go To Space
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Welcome to the Microbiome, Archaea!
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Roos Blindside Driverless Cars
Placeholder
Biodiversity of Antarctica Under Threat From Increase In Ice-Free Areas
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - The Future of the Census
Placeholder
Tell Me! Brian Cox
Placeholder
Crash, Burn, Tweak, Repeat
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Humans Just Got Older and Wiser
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Cheers to Brain Health?
Placeholder
Gene Therapy Could Cure Allergies
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - iHeart Hacking
Placeholder
Ridiculology - New Hubble
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Trees Alone Can't Save Us
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Earth's Accidental Force Field
Placeholder
Dinosaurs on the Big Screen
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Farewell MP3
Placeholder
Kids Beat Grown-ups on Pneumonia Vaccines
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - The Booger Conspiracy
Placeholder
FameLab 2017 National Final - Part 2
Placeholder
FameLab 2017 National Final - Part 1
Placeholder
2017 Budget Response
Placeholder
What Are Animal Weapons?
Placeholder
If You Love Both Art and Science, Be a Scientific Illustrator
Placeholder
Getting Personal With Skinks
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - CSIRO Email Leaks
Placeholder
FameLab 2017 Western Australia Semi-Final Highlights
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - New Hope for Premmies
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Britain Goes Coal-Free
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Naked Mole-Rats (SFW)
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Easter Reminders
Placeholder
Meet Andrea Boyd - Space Flight Controller
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Sperm Drug Smugglers
Placeholder
FameLab 2017 New South Wales Semi-Final Highlights
Placeholder
The Science of Fiction
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Liquorice Poisoning
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Crowdsourcing Science
Placeholder
FameLab 2017 Queensland Semi-Final Highlights
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - SpaceX Preps for Relaunch
Placeholder
Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome Breakthrough
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Surviving a Media Storm
Placeholder
Will This Aussie Team Win the Race to Create the Ultimate Malaria Vaccine?
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - New Dino Family Tree
Placeholder
How to fix things with Kyle Wiens
Placeholder
Repair or replace? iFixit co-founder Kyle Wiens
Placeholder
Special Investigation - No Alternative to Cancer
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Raspberry Pi is Number 3 Best-Selling Computer
Placeholder
If reefs can't adapt, are they doomed?
Placeholder
Art, Music, Science, Society - Sir Tim Smit Has Thoughts On It All
Placeholder
Assembling the Best Team (according to Sir Tim Smit)
Placeholder
What's up with the Rogue Ginger?
Placeholder
Make Me A Martian
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Recognising the Ethical Dilemma in Facial Tracking Software
Placeholder
Science Communication Around the Globe
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Elon to the Rescue
Placeholder
Sing Us a Song, Spaceman!
Placeholder
Feather Map Of Australia Citizen Science Project
Placeholder
Tim Jarvis vs Mountain: Neuroscience
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Don't Pee in the Pool!
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - A New Organ That's as Old as You Are
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Australia's Bill of Sexual Health
Placeholder
Budget 2016 - The Science Forecast
Placeholder
Ideas Boom - What the Innovation Statement Means for You
Placeholder
Celebrating the 2016 Prime Minister's Prizes for Science
Placeholder
Behind the Scenes at Science Meets Parliament 2016
Placeholder
ECRN - Publish or Perish - A Trip Down the Ugly Side
Placeholder
ECRN - Publish or Perish with Corey Bradshaw
Placeholder
ECRN - Publish or Perish with Angela Eggleston
Placeholder
Coral Bleaching Explained: the story of Frank the coral
Placeholder
The Amazing Life Cycle of the European Eel
Placeholder
Zero Gravity
Placeholder
ECRN - Grant Writing Workshop
Placeholder
ECRN - Managing the Balance
Placeholder
ECRN - Research Linkages with Industry
Placeholder
ECRN - Alternative Careers with Dr Leigh Guerin
Placeholder
ECRN - How to Collaborate with Industry
Placeholder
ECRN - Alternative Careers Q&A
Placeholder
ECRN - Collaborating with Industry
Placeholder
Ground Control to Major Chris
Placeholder
Jane Elith - Life Scientist of the Year, 2015 Prime Minister's Prizes for Science
Placeholder
Graeme Jameson - winner of Prize for Innovation, 2015 Prime Minister's Prizes for Science
Placeholder
Graham Farquhar – Scientist of the Year, 2015 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science
Placeholder
Tim Jarvis vs Mountain: Endurance
Placeholder
Secrets of the Panama Papers
Placeholder
Susan Greenfield is here to tell you about your brain!
01:03:11
Placeholder
Brew La La - Oscars 2017
Placeholder
Creating The Airbus A380
Placeholder
Science Meets Business 2016
Placeholder
Minister Pyne's speech - 2015 Prime Minister's Prizes for Science
Placeholder
2016 Year in Review
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Sweaty Robots From Japan
Placeholder
Think You Might Be a Programmer?
Placeholder
Want to start coding? Here's some basic tips
Placeholder
The Swimming Physicist
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Is Washing Your Hands Actually A Dirty Habit?
Placeholder
FameLab 2017 Call Out
Placeholder
CRISPR and Human Embryos
Placeholder
Lucky Tran - Career Map Of A Science Communicator
Placeholder
Brew Ha Ha - Trumping Your Christmas Family Arguments