Supercharged bandages improve wound healing

Proudly supported by

  Last updated July 28, 2020 at 2:27 pm

Topics:  

Using a new plasma coating on current wound dressings could promote the healing of chronic wounds and reduce patient suffering.


bandages_wound dressing_bandaged foot

Credit: Shutterstock




Why This Matters: Medical treatments are continuing to advance.




World-first plasma-coated bandages with the power to attack infection and inflammation could revolutionise the treatment of chronic wounds such as pressure, diabetic or vascular ulcers that won’t heal on their own.


Developed by the University of South Australia, the novel coating comprises a special antioxidant which can be applied to any wound dressing to simultaneously reduce wound inflammation a­­nd break up infection to aid in wound repair.




Also: Prawn shells: from waste to wonder wound healer




In Australia, nearly half a million people suffer from chronic wounds, costing the health system an estimated AUD$3 billion each year. It’s a similar picture around the world with more than 5.7 million people suffering from chronic wounds in the United States, costing the economy an estimated USD$20 billion each year; and in the UK, more than 2 million people are currently living with chronic wounds at a cost of £5 billion per year.


Super-charged bandages could reduce patient suffering


With growing rates of global obesity, diabetes and an ageing population, chronic wounds are increasingly affecting large proportions of the general population, yet until this breakthrough discovery, few treatments have shown such positive results.




Also: Fighting fierce against deadly fungal infections




Lead researcher, Dr Thomas Michl, from UniSA STEM,  says that upgrading current dressings with this state-of-the-art coating will promote effective healing on chronic wounds and reduce patient suffering.


“Proper care for chronic wounds requires frequent changes of wound dressings but currently, these wound dressings are passive actors in wound management,” Michl says.


“Our novel coatings change this, turning any wound dressing into an active participant in the healing process – not only covering and protecting the wound, but also knocking down excessive inflammation and infection.


“No other method achieves this to date.”


The technology is highly scalable and sustainable, making it a viable option for broad application worldwide.


Teach This


Education resource – Supercharged bandages improve wound healing


More Like This


A simple gel could help prevent radiation burns


Shape-shifting stretchy hyrdogel is like a self-healing skin




About the Author

UniSA Newsroom
The latest and best news from the University of South Australia.

Published By

The University of South Australia is Australia’s University of Enterprise. Our culture of innovation is anchored around global and national links to academic, research and industry partners. Our graduates are the new urban professionals, global citizens at ease with the world and ready to create and respond to change. Our research is inventive and adventurous and we create new knowledge that is central to global economic and social prosperity.


Featured Videos

Placeholder
Breathe easy firefighters: respiratory masks make the difference
Placeholder
Birds and Bees (an exhibit at MOD.)
Placeholder
What is MOD.?
Placeholder
MOD. Behind the Scenes – The making of MOD.IFY
Placeholder
Sit Down With… (A MOD. exhibit)
Placeholder
Cat personality explained: understanding the Feline Five
Placeholder
The Science of Cycling - Psychology
Placeholder
The Science of Cycling - Nutrition
Placeholder
The Science of Cycling - Performance
Placeholder
How To Be More Creative
Placeholder
Wonders of 3D Printing
Placeholder
The prevalence of elder abuse in South Australia
Placeholder
Morphogenetic prototyping laboratory
Placeholder
The economic value of services provided by nature
Placeholder
When should a person be discharged in a community mental health setting?
Placeholder
Revealing information about disease progression in cancer
Placeholder
Finding urothelia cancers from urine samples
Placeholder
The history of Aboriginal stolen wages in South Australia
Placeholder
Creative strategies to support learning outcomes in numeracy
Placeholder
Designing dining in an age friendly world
Placeholder
Detecting placental insufficiency in pregnant women
Placeholder
Understanding preferences of patients with chronic conditions
Placeholder
Advanced industrialised and prefabricated construction
Placeholder
Do high quality habitats reduce disease prevalence?
Placeholder
Archiving digital architectural records
Placeholder
Developing a neurovascular marker of cognitive impairment
Placeholder
Developing new treatments for skin cancer