Splitting hydrogen from water just got a whole lot cheaper and easier

  Last updated December 16, 2019 at 10:36 am

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Scientists have created hydrogen using only water, iron, nickel and electricity, and much cheaper than before.


hydrogen_hydrogen-fuelled cars_hydrogen-powered cars

Hydrogen-powered cars could soon become a reality. Credit: Credit: iStock




Why This Matters: This is a gamechanger for Australia’s transition to the hydrogen economy.




Hydrogen-powered cars may soon become more than just a novelty after a UNSW-led team of scientists demonstrated a much cheaper and sustainable way to create the hydrogen required to power them.


In research published in Nature Communications, scientists from UNSW Sydney, Griffith University and Swinburne University of Technology showed that capturing hydrogen by splitting it from oxygen in water can be achieved by using low-cost metals like iron and nickel as catalysts, which speed up this chemical reaction while requiring less energy.


The magic happens at the nanoscale


Iron and nickel, which are found in abundance on Earth, would replace precious metals ruthenium, platinum and iridium that up until now are regarded as benchmark catalysts in the ‘water-splitting’ process.


UNSW School of Chemistry’s Chuan Zhao says in water splitting, two electrodes apply an electric charge to water which enables hydrogen to be split from oxygen and used as energy in a fuel cell.


“What we do is coat the electrodes with our catalyst to reduce energy consumption,” he says. “On this catalyst there is a tiny nano-scale interface where the iron and nickel meet at the atomic level, which becomes an active site for splitting water. This is where hydrogen can be split from oxygen and captured as fuel, and the oxygen can be released as an environmentally-friendly waste.”




Also: New catalyst material produces abundant cheap hydrogen




In 2015, Zhao’s team invented a nickel-iron electrode for oxygen generation with a record-high efficiency. However, Zhao says that on their own, iron and nickel are not good catalysts for hydrogen generation, but where they join at the nanoscale is “where the magic happens”.


“The nanoscale interface fundamentally changes the property of these materials,” he says. “Our results show the nickel-iron catalyst can be as active as the platinum one for hydrogen generation.


“An additional benefit is that our nickel-iron electrode can catalyse both the hydrogen and oxygen generation, so not only could we slash the production costs by using Earth-abundant elements, but also the costs of manufacturing one catalyst instead of two.”


A gamechanger in the transition to a hydrogen economy


A quick glance at today’s metal prices shows just why this could be the gamechanger needed to speed the transition towards the so-called hydrogen economy. Iron and nickel are priced at $0.13 and $19.65 a kilogram. By contrast, ruthenium, platinum and iridium are priced at $11.77, $42.13 and $69.58 per gram – in other words, thousands of times more expensive.




Also: Alan Finkel – Australia’s hydrogen future has arrived




“At the moment in our fossil fuel economy, we have this huge incentive to move to a hydrogen economy so that we can be using it as a clean energy carrier which is abundant on Earth,” Zhao says.


“We’ve been talking about the hydrogen economy for ages, but this time it looks as though it’s really coming.”


Zhao says that if the water-splitting technology is developed further, there could one day be hydrogen refuelling stations much like petrol stations today where you could go and fill up your hydrogen fuel-cell car with hydrogen gas produced by this water-splitting reaction. The refuelling could be done in a matter of minutes as compared to hours in the case of lithium-battery powered electric cars.


“We’re hoping our research can be used by stations like these to make their own hydrogen using sustainable sources such as water, solar and these low cost, yet efficient, catalysts.”


More Like This


New catalyst material produces abundant cheap hydrogen


Why the next generation of rockets will be powered by methane




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