Latest Science


What you can do before conception to give your baby the best chance

Diet and lifestyle of both parents affect offspring. One of the world’s top medical journals, The Lancet, has been investigating what changes parents can make before conception to give their children the best chance at long-term health. First up is the need for better guidance when planning pregnancies, as well as increasing public health measures to reduce obesity and improve nutrition. “The preconception period is a critical time when parental health – including weight, metabolism, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Kelly Wong from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Injection successfully protects monkeys against HIV for 20 weeks

A single injection has successfully provided up to 20 weeks of protection against HIV infection in monkeys, in a landmark US study. Although successful campaigning has seen AIDS numbers drop globally, HIV remains to have no vaccine or cure. A new study provides an alternative treatment; researchers have demonstrated that one single injection of HIV-targeting antibodies can protect monkeys from the simian version of HIV (SHIV) infection for up to 20 weeks. Previous studies have […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Kelly Wong from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Immune cells hold hope for brain repair after trauma

The body’s defences against infection could also help mend physical damage to brain tissue, a new study has found. “The lining of the brain, with help from the immune system, has a remarkable ability to put itself back together again after injury,” said Dorian McGavern, who led research by the National Institutes of Health. “As we learn more about all the cells involved in the repair process, we may be able to identify potential targets […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Alayna Hansen from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Could your laptop's waste heat charge the battery?

No more cooked legs while using your laptop thanks to a new nanofilm. It’s a feeling most of us will know. You’re sitting on the couch working away on your laptop, and you start to feel your legs getting warmer and warmer from the heat of the laptop. After a while you need to move just to let your legs cool down. All that heat is wasted energy, a by-product of the workings of the electrical […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel

Study uncovers new asthma risks

Damp houses and gas stoves are major causes of childhood asthma. A national strategy is needed to increase awareness of the risks of asthma to children, researchers from the University of Queensland say. They say most parents are aware of ways to minimise exposure to dust mites, pollen and animal hair through vacuuming and replacing carpets with hard flooring, but other indoor exposures are not as well recognised. “We found that 12 per cent of […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Bill Condie from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

NASA's TESS launches today

The newest exoplanet hunter is on the pad and ready for launch. NASA’s newest exoplanet hunting satellite telescope is scheduled to launch later today from the Cape Canaveral in Florida. The telescope, known as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, will be looking for planets outside of our Solar System, helping scientists discover what these planets are made of, and potentially whether any of them might be able to support life. Its launch comes […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Experts fear an epidemic of 'flesh-eating' ulcers

Tissue-destroying disease growing in intensity and reach in Australia. Infectious disease experts are calling for an “urgent scientific response” to avoid an epidemic of Buruli ulcers, which cause severe destructive lesions of skin and soft tissue. A team from Barwon Health in Geelong, led by Professor Daniel O’Brien, says the problem is increasing in several areas of the country but is particularly severe in regional Victoria, which saw a 51 per cent increase (from 156 […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne
Topics -

LED light pollution wreaks havoc on the natural world

Brighter artificial lighting is affecting biological functions such as sleep, immune function, growth, reproduction and survival in the animal – and human – worlds. In simple environmental terms, LED lights appear a clear winner. They are significantly more efficient than traditional incandescent bulbs and last considerably longer. But they are also a lot brighter, individually and collectively, and that is increasing the levels of light pollution across large swathes of the planet. Studies from various parts of […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Physics explains the mysteries of Guinness

Its fans agree that stout – a dark, thick, heavy form of beer – is a wonderful thing, but some have occasionally speculated that it might be miraculous as well. More observant drinkers will have noticed a peculiar and counterintuitive phenomenon when stout is poured into a classic pint glass designed by the Irish brewery Guinness. When first poured, the beer forms an immediate and turbulent head of bubbles. At first, it occupies almost all […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel

Space pic of the week: Yuri Gagarin

The space flight hero launched on 12 April 1961 to become the first human to orbit the Earth. This week marked the anniversary of Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin’s history-making flight to become the first human to ever orbit Earth. At 6:07am UTC on 12 April 1961, Gagarin’s Vostok 3KA capsule launched from Site No. 1 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, in modern-day Kazakhstan. As the rocket lifted off, the lead rocket engineer Sergei Korolev radioed “Preliminary stage….. […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Drinking at levels deemed 'safe' could be killing you

Drinking more than 10 standard drinks a week, just six beers or glasses of wine, could lead to an early death, researchers say. A global study of alcohol consumption this week casts doubt on current Australian health guidelines that recommend a maximum of 14 drinks a week as the ‘safe’ level of drinking. The research combined data stretching back to 1964, including nearly 600,000 drinkers from 19 countries, 11,000 of whom were Australians. “Increased mortality […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Joseph Milton
Topics -

Charismatic animals are suffering too

We have a false sense of security about endangered animals with high visibility in the media. When it comes to conservation biology, some animals garner more attention than others. However, researchers say this could give the general public a false impression that species such as lions, tigers and gorillas are doing okay in the wild. Researchers identified “virtual populations” the 10 most charismatic animals with the strongest media presence by surveying school children, international zoo […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Kelly Wong from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Modern humans came after the sweet potato

The timeline of the world’s favourite staple food gives new insights into human migration. Botanists have shown that the humble sweet potato is vastly older than modern humans, challenging current theories of early human migration. Originating in Central and South America, sweet potatoes are one of the most widely consumed crops in the world. Scientists have long thought that their existence in Polynesia meant that ancient seafaring Polynesians must have made the 8,000-kilometre trek across […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lauren Fuge from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Why eating the hottest chilli in the world is a bad idea

A chilli-eating competitor in the US developed “thunderclap headaches” after eating the world’s hottest chilli. In unsurprising news out of the US, eating chillies straight is a bad idea. One competitor in a chilli-eating competition got more than he bargained for when he was served up the hottest chilli in the world, the scorchingly hot Carolina Reaper. The 34-year-old man ended up in a New York state hospital with excruciatingly painful headaches called “thunderclap headaches” […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Things are heating up in the oceans

Think heatwaves on land are getting bad? It’s nothing compared to what’s happening under the sea. An international study has found that marine heatwaves are getting longer, more frequent and hotter, and that spells bad news for not only the fish, but for us too. The research, which involved Australian researches from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) and the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), found that since 1925, the […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Outback radio telescope listens in on interstellar visitor

Researchers from Perth’s ICRAR have used telescopes in the outback to spy on an interstellar visitor. A telescope in outback Western Australia has been used to listen to a mysterious cigar-shaped object that entered our Solar System late last year. The unusual object—known as ‘Oumuamua—came from another solar system, prompting speculation it could be an alien spacecraft. “So astronomers went back through observations from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope to check for radio transmissions […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: ICRAR Outreach from The International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research
Topics -

New light on human expansion into Indonesia

Delving deeper into a Sulawesi site shows Ice Age hunter-gatherers long preceding cave art culture of later groups. Humans may have occupied an Indonesian rock shelter 15,000 years earlier than previously thought, archaeologists say, providing new insights into the history of human migration and cultural evolution. The limestone rock shelter, called Leang Burung 2, is located on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, which is part of the vast Wallacea archipelago sandwiched between today’s Borneo and Papua […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lauren Fuge from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Fish confused by too much carbon dioxide

Acidification is leading marine animals astray. It’s not just birds and animals that are being led astray by the impact of humans on their natural environment. It seems fish are affected too. A new study from the University of Adelaide suggests that baby fish will find it harder to reach secure shelters in future acidified oceans, putting fish populations at risk. The researchers have described how barramundi larvae in high CO2 conditions, which are predicted […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Nemo's home falls victim to climate change

Global warming is bleaching the anemones that clownfish call home, and the stress is showing. Sea anemones are falling prey to bleaching of reefs caused by global warming, with a cascading effect on other animals which rely on them, such as the anemonefish, or clownfish, that live symbiotically with them. To understand what was happening, researchers compared juvenile orange-fin anemonefish living in bleached and unbleached sea anemones for two weeks. The metabolic rate of fish from […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Kelly Wong from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Husband's genes can affect the age women become mothers

Researchers have found that men have an indirect genetic effect on the reproductive timing of their female partners.   A woman’s genes can influence the age she becomes a mother, but a new study, which looks at 400 years of records from two Swiss villages, suggests her partner’s can also play a big role. For the study, researchers looked at parish data from 1578 to 1977, and took into consideration birth, marriages and deaths of individuals, as […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Kelly Wong from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Tour the Moon in 4K with new video from NASA

See the Moon as never before thanks to data from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. This virtual tour of the Moon is a reprise of the original video released in 2011 using data from the  the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission. The near-five minute animation has now been re-released in super high definition 4K resolution drawing from the vastly expanded data trove collected by LRO since 2011. “The tour visits a number of interesting sites chosen […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Friendly bacteria help lead ants down the garden path

Scientists have discovered an element of the microbiome that helps leafcutter ants find their way. The way that ants lay down chemical trails for their colony-mates to follow may be the result of a bacterium stored in their poison glands, research suggests. In seeking to analyse the bacterial colony that lives in and on the leafcutter ant (Atta sexdens rubropilosa) a team of researchers from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil discovered that one […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Time to explore what those ‘60s drugs can do

The law is holding back research into the remarkable potential of psychedelic drugs to treat mental illness. Australia is missing out on the potential value of psychedelic drugs due to a combination of conservatism, prejudice and misinformation, according to two leading psychologists. They say it is time to catch up with overseas researchers, who have been investigating the likes of LSD and psilocybin (the active compound in “magic mushrooms”) to treat mental illnesses such as post-traumatic […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Happy chickens like one shade of grey

How do you give a chicken hope? Show it a square of grey-coloured laminated card. Colours associated with rewards have lasting effects on the mood of chickens. That’s the curious result of a Swedish experiment designed to measure optimism in the birds – a key indicator for whether they are coping with the stresses inherent in living in an enclosure. A team led ethologist Hanne Løvlien from Sweden’s Linköping University used 96 Bovans Robust chicks raised […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Fishing more environmentally friendly than farming

Chowing down on fish is more climate-friendly than getting stuck into a beef burger. Greenhouse gas emissions associated with commercial fishing around the globe are increasing, but they are still way below those produced by lamb or beef farming, research by scientists from Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and Canada’s University of British Columbia has found. The paper, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, represents the first time emissions from fishing […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

1 53 54 55 56 57 69