Latest Science


A huge dinosaur discovery fills gaps in Africa’s history

Fossil tells a previously unknown story about the evolution of Earth itself. For hundreds of years we’ve been studying dinosaur fossils, but Africa around 100-66 million years ago is still a bit of a blank page. A new dinosaur discovery has started filling in those details, and also revealed far more about the Earth at that time than we expected. In the Sahara Desert, palaeontologists from Mansoura University in Egypt have discovered the fossils of […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Birds and mammals beat lizards and amphibians to survive climate change

Some species can adapt faster to changing environmental conditions. Researchers have examined the distribution of 11,465 species over the last 270 million years to understand how animals adapt to changing climatic conditions. Endotherms are animals that use metabolic energy to keep themselves warm, like mammals and birds.  They are able to thrive in a wider range of climatic conditions than ectotherms like lizards or amphibians.  Because the environmental temperature influences the activity of cold-blooded animals, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lisa Bailey from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Bad news for writers, your words can't compete with one good picture

It appears not only that a picture is worth a thousand of a writer’s words, but also that the picture’s impact can be almost instantaneous. New research suggests that nearly invisible images shown for as little as 10 milliseconds can stimulate human responses but that words – even emotive words – have nowhere near the same effect. In previous work, Psychologist Professor Piotr Winkielman and colleagues from the University of California, San Diego, had reported […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Great Barrier Reef mapped in high resolution for the first time

This is the Great Barrier Reef like you’ve never seen before. All 1.5 million square kilometres of the Great Barrier Reef have been mapped. This four-year project is a collaboration between Geoscience Australia, James Cook University, and the Australian Hydrographic Service. This project collated millions of dollars’ worth of existing datasets from government sources including the Australian Hydrographic Service, along with new seafloor mapping data. It combined the use of airborne LiDAR technology, a remote […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Kelly Wong from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Brain gains – How exercise improves your brain

Neuroscientist and CrossFit-enthusiast Dr Amy Reichelt reveals how exercise can help your brain. Exercise has a wide range of benefits for the body. It improves cardiovascular fitness, lowers blood pressure and reduces the chance of developing heart disease and stroke. But more than just improving your fitness, aerobic exercise has a range of benefits for your brain too. A recent study from researchers at UNSW Sydney showed that short burst of exercise after study could […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Amy Reichelt from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Parents who supply alcohol to teens are doing more harm than good

The relationship between parents and teenagers is a tricky one. It gets even more complicated with some parents believing that supplying alcohol to their teenagers will protect them from alcohol-related risks. New research shows that this is not the case. An Australian-led study of almost 2,000 teenagers between 12- and 18-years-old and their parents found there was no benefit or protective effects associated with giving teenagers alcohol compared to teens who were not given alcohol. […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Kelly Wong from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Health risks of Caesarean vs vaginal birth examined

Scottish scientists have compiled data from 80 studies looking at the risks of caesarean births and vaginal births in order to compare the risks. Encompassing nearly 30 million pregnancies, the study found that there were benefits and risks in both birth types. We’ve compiled the main findings into this handy infographic. The research was published in PLOS Medicine Related Pregnancy and paracetamol – researchers flag developmental concerns Detecting placental insufficiency in pregnant women The business […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Has human performance peaked?

Humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance. A recent review suggests humans have biological limitations, and that anthropogenic impacts on the environment — including climate change — could have a deleterious effect on these limits. Published in Frontiers in Physiology, this review is the first of its kind spanning 120 years worth of historical information, while considering the effects of both genetic and environmental parameters. A transdisciplinary research team from across France studied trends emerging […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Freya Wilson from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Earliest modern human remains found out of Africa

Our ancestors may have left Africa 50,000 years earlier than previous thought. Researchers have discovered the earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa, in Mislaya cave on Mount Carmel in Israel. “Misliya is an exciting discovery,” says Rolf Quam, Binghamton University anthropology professor and a coauthor of a study into the find. “It provides the clearest evidence yet that our ancestors first migrated out of Africa much earlier than we previously believed. Related: Did […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Bill Condie from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

A roadside test for marijuana intoxication? It’s not as easy as it sounds

Questions are being asked about how we test drivers for the effects of weed – and there are no easy answers. As more and more places legalise marijuana, there are worries about the effect it could have on road safety. Just like getting blotto on alcohol affects your ability to drive, researchers are concerned about the effect of being high behind the wheel. However, no roadside test for marijuana intoxication actually exists. And that is […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Music really is the universal language

People can quickly make accurate inferences about what a singer is singing, even if they don’t understand the words. If you enjoy world music, it may not just be the music that is ticking the boxes for you. Songs with a similar function – be it soothing you to sleep, expressing undying love or motivating you to dance – tend also to sound similar, irrespective of which country and culture they come from. “Despite the […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel

Forgotten antibiotic could return to fight superbugs

A drug discovered 40 years ago, but never used, is being re-evaluated as pipeline for new antibiotics dries up. “Octapeptins were discovered in the late 1970s but were not selected for development at the time, as there was an abundance of new antibiotics with thousands of people working in antibiotic research and development,” says Professor Matt Cooper, Director of IMB’s Centre for Superbug Solutions. University of Queensland Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) researchers have synthesised the antibiotic, and demonstrated that […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Bill Condie from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

That mosquito is targeting you on purpose, here's how to get payback

One of the reasons mosquitoes are so annoying could be that they are actually quite smart. The up side is that it may help us work out how to keep them away. The humble mossie can learn to associate a particular odour with an unpleasant mechanical shock akin to being swatted and will avoid that scent the next time. And it is quite a strong response. “Once mosquitoes learned odours in an aversive manner, those […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

The Check Up - CRISPR, networks, and electricity

The Check Up is a weekly feature highlighting some of the best, most fascinating, most important, or simply unmissable health, medical, and human stories from around the web. 86 people have already had CRISPR gene editing in China Um, so this is bonkers … there is evidence of 11 clinical trials involving gene editing in humans using CRISPR in China, with a total of 28 people having their DNA altered since 2015. CRISPR is an incredibly promising technology, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Heart disease makes the ‘flu extra dangerous

People at risk of heart disease need to be extra careful about avoiding influenza, as the risk of a heart attack rises 600% in the week following diagnosis. Researchers from Canada studied nearly 20,000 cases of influenza infection in adults. They found that for the 332 subjects who were hospitalised for a heart attack within one year of their diagnoses, they were six times more likely to experience their incident within seven days after their […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Have we been looking for life on other planets the wrong way?

The search for oxygen may have been a red herring – after all many life forms have survived without it, even on Earth. Until now, one strategy scientists have used to look for life on other planets is trying to detect oxygen in their atmospheres. But a new paper has suggested a new recipe for providing evidence that a distant planet harbors life. It involves looking not for oxygen, but for the presence of two […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Humidity-powered “inchworming” robots are coming to get you… slowly

Scientists have created small robots which do not require any batteries or electricity. Instead, they’re powered solely by the humidity in the air. They’re inspired by plants, and just like plants, they’re… slow. One major challenge of robotic engineering is finding a power source that doesn’t require constant monitoring, as batteries and electricity do. Inspired by how certain plants expand in response to humidity, scientists have developed simple robots that are instead powered by an […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel

The chocolate chip cookie dough theory of Earth's mantle 

The Earth’s formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought. New evidence suggests that when the Earth’s core was extracted from the mantle, the mantle never fully mixed, leaving a number of dense pockets – not unlike chocolate chips in cookie dough. That is surprising given that the core formation happened in the immediate wake of large impacts from other early Solar System objects that the Earth experienced during its growth, similar […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel

Why speed alone can't save a zebra from a lion

In the predator-prey arms race between cheetah, impala, lion and zebra, the predators are more athletic, more powerful, faster and manoeuvrable. If you’re an impala, grazing on the African Savannah, your best bet on escaping being eaten by a cheetah is to be unpredictable. In a chase, it’s the prey which set the speed and timing of accelerations and turns, and it’s up to the predator to be able to predict their movements and keep […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lisa Bailey from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Scientists develop a tractor beam that can levitate objects

We’ve seen it in sci-fi, but now scientists from the University of Bristol have developed a powerful acoustic tractor beam that can hold objects in mid-air. Researchers have made every kid’s dream come true by demonstrating the world’s most powerful acoustic tractor beam. All of a sudden, Star Wars and Doctor Who seem a lot more plausible. Until now, the size of objects that can be picked up by acoustic tractor beams has been limited […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel

Tracking bacteria to deliver better therapies

Californian researchers have cleared the way for ultrasound to become a tool to interact within the body at the micro-scale. By combining ultrasound imaging with genetic engineering of bacterial microbes, scientists have been able to track bacteria dispatched to deliver therapies deep inside the body. The potential, they say, is for doctors to use this approach to keep tabs on the effectiveness of treatments for everything from inflammatory disease to cancer. “Ultrasound has been around for […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel

Let Jupiter be the yardstick when defining new planets, physicist suggests

As scientific debate continues over what is and isn’t a planet, an American astrophysicist has decided it’s time to add one key parameter – size. Astrophysicist Kevin Schlaufman has weighed into the debate over how to define planets with a deceptively simple suggestion – set the upper boundary of planet mass at between four and 10 times the mass of the planet Jupiter. Bigger than that, he says, and it’s a brown dwarf. It’s an […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Four animals that can find their way around better than you

Forget Google Maps and GPS, some animals have humans beaten when it comes to navigation. They can find their way around far better than you can. Of the many amazing things animals can do, one of their party tricks is navigation. They could be out in the middle of nowhere, but they still know which direction to go to get home. While humans rely on technology, some animals don’t need anything other than their brain […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Lack of diversity in gut microbiome linked to ovarian cysts

Polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, affects between 7 and 10 per cent of women of childbearing age, and new research shows that they have less diverse bacteria populating their gut microbiome.   Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are likely to have less diverse gut bacteria than their condition-free peers, which could exacerbate or lead to other health conditions. Researchers compared the microbiomes of 73 PCOS-diagnosed women with 48 PCOS-free women and 42 women with polycystic […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Volcanic ‘time capsule’ crystals may help us predict eruptions

Small crystals found in lava may hold the key to understanding how volcanoes will behave in future. The changing composition and growth of crystals as they move upwards through a volcano are recorded in layers, which can be read like the growth rings on a tree. A new study suggests that the history from these layers, as they grow in magma and rise from depths of around 30 kilometres to the surface of the Earth, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Bill Condie
Topics -

1 46 47 48 49 50 52