Latest Science


Space pic of the week: ISS photobombs the Moon!

The International Space Station cheekily photobombs the moon. This incredible photograph caught the International Space Station as it crosses between Earth and the Moon at roughly five miles per second. It was captured on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, from Virginia, United States. Onboard the ISS is a crew of six – NASA astronauts Joe Acaba, Mark Vande Hei, and Scott Tingle; Russian Cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin and Anton Shkaplerov, and Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai. From tip […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
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Parent education, not income, influences obesity in kids

But US study finds widening gap in obesity between high and low income girls Parental educational levels are more important than income when it comes to childhood obesity risks, new data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show. Results from the latest tranche of the CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), covering the years 2011 to 2014, show that in households headed by a college graduate, 9.6 per cent […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel
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Orangutan numbers facing an apocalypse in Borneo

Borneo is one of the last refuges for wild orangutans, but numbers have dropped by around half since 1999 Orangutans are a close relative of humans, but are endangered in the wild due to our own actions. Now limited to the rainforests of Borneo and Sumatra, their numbers continue to decrease every year, and a new analysis has revealed just how sharp that decline is. Over a 16-year period, from 1999 to 2015, about half […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
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Fat is everything in the coldest place on Earth

Nature has dished up some pretty extreme milks over the course of evolution, but hooded seal milk is in a league of its own. While human breast milk contains a relatively modest amount of fat (between three and five per cent), hooded seal milk contains a whopping 60 per cent fat, making it the fattiest milk known to science. So why do seals need such extreme milk? That’s a question for Professor Mark Hindell from the University of Tasmania , whose […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from University of Tasmania
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In a galactic tug of war, the Milky Way is not as disadvantaged as we thought

Australian researchers have found that the Andromeda galaxy is roughly the same size as our own Milky Way – which could change everything when it comes to the death of our galaxy. Astronomers have discovered that our nearest big neighbour, the Andromeda galaxy, is roughly the same size as the Milky Way. It had been thought that Andromeda was two to three times the size of the Milky Way, and that our own galaxy would […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: ICRAR Outreach from The International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research
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Murray-Darling plan on the brink - but what do the experts think?

Changes to the Murray-Darling basin plan proposed by the Federal Government have just been blocked by the Senate, throwing the entire plan into jeopardy. The changes would have seen less water returned to ecosystems in northern New South Wales and southern Queensland, with the former state joined by Victoria in threats to withdraw from the plan. Labor and the Greens have joined forces to block the plan, but have seen strong opposition from the National […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel

The Check Up - bodies, tongues, and mosquitos

The Check Up is a weekly feature highlighting some of the best, most fascinating, most important, or simply unmissable health, medical, and human stories from around the web. Looking inward If you’re not feeling well, it’s super common to google your symptoms and play Internet Doctor. This has positive and negative consequences, but I have to think that more information about health and the human body is ultimately a good thing. This article will introduce you to a […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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Scientists take a step closer to poo transplant pills

The success of faecal transplant therapy is determined in large part by similarities between donor and recipient microbial gut populations, research has found. Despite the rapidly increasing popularity of faecal transplants for treating a range of diseases, a study led by Harvard geneticist Christopher Smillie is the first to identify the mechanisms by which the process works. Faecal transplant pretty much involves what the term suggests. Poo from a healthy person is transferred in to […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel
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Evidence for refining Alzheimer's treatment after first ever disease reversal in mice

Current drugs used to treat Alzheimer’s disease, BACE1 inhibitors, could be far more effective thanks to new findings from mice experiments. BACE1 enzyme target The drugs target an enzyme called BACE1, which forms a build-up of beta-amyloid peptide in the brain – one of the earliest events in Alzheimer’s disease. By gradually depleting BACE1 in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease, researchers completely reversed the formation of amyloid plaques. This improved the mice’s cognitive […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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A down-to-Earth journey to 'Mars' gets under way

Four people are about to enter an isolated dome in Hawai’i, cut off from the rest of the world for eight months. We spoke to one of them as she was preparing for the mission. Walking down a street in Hilo, the largest city on the “big island” of Hawai’i, Lisa Stojanovski looks like any other 20-something Australian tourist. To passers-by she could be heading off for a surf at one of the pristine beaches, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
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Transgender woman breastfeeds baby exclusively for six weeks

World’s first reported case of induced lactation in a transgender woman. A transgender mother has been able to breastfeed her child and was the baby’s exclusive source of nourishment for the first six weeks of its life. It is “the first formal report in the medical literature of induced lactation in a transgender woman”, the authors of a report detailing the case say. Breast is best Breastfeeding plays an important immunological, metabolic, and psychosocial role […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andy Stapleton
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No soldier left behind – how ants look after their wounded

By carrying injured comrades back from termite mound raids and licking their wounds, African Matabele ants decrease fatalities of the injured ants from 80 per cent to 10 per cent. “Medic” behaviour could be unique A research team from Germany has just described this behaviour as potentially unique in the animal kingdom – and certainly, no other insects are known to tend wounds. This species of ant raids termite mounds up to four times a […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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A third of children in detention in WA have Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

And 90 per cent have a severe neuro-disability. Prof Carol Bower and Clinical Associate Professor Raewyn Mutch spent two years working with 100 young people ranging in age from 10 to 17 in the Banksia Hill youth detention facility, with the results published in the BMJ Open today. Many of the young people in detention have a long history of contact with government and child service agencies before their incarceration. Bower said the team had […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lisa Bailey from Australia's Science Channel

Caffeine and kids: the no-go combo that’s keeping children awake.

Parents and doctors need to look again at children’s diets. University of South Australia researchers are calling for parents and clinicians to take stock of children’s diets following new research that shows a causal relationship between primary-aged children’s caffeine intake, poor sleep and difficult daytime behaviour. The study, published in the Journal of Clinic Sleep Medicine, examined the relationship between caffeine consumption, sleep, and daytime behaviour in Australian children aged 8-12 years, seeking to determine […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Annabel Mansfield from University of South Australia
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DNA origami nanorobots developed to seek and destroy cancer

Like a microscopic Rambo, they hunt down and attack tumours It sounds like science fiction, but scientists from the US and China have built nanorobots 1,000 times smaller than a human hair, that move around the body on a cancer seek and destroy mission. Completely autonomously, they travel through blood vessels looking for tumours, and then cut off their blood supply, effectively choking them to death. This genius approach has been used in mammals for […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
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Russian connection sheds light on the mystery of the Ediacaran fossils

New study using hydrocarbon biomarkers leads to partial breakthrough in identifying famous South Australian fossils. Ever since they were first discovered in South Australia in 1942, the world’s oldest large fossils have presented palaeontologists with a mystery: what manner of creature made them? Now, however, a joint Russian and Australian research project has finally solved part of the mystery. The fossils, dubbed the Ediacara biota because the first examples were discovered in the Ediacara Hills region […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel
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Organic? Fair trade? Sustainable? Maybe none of the above...

Do the claims of sustainable products actually mean anything? According to a new study, it might all be a corporate con job. Your average afternoon chocolate snack has a range of messages from the manufacturer trying to entice you with their responsible corporate practices. And you try to choose one which appears ethical, because you prefer your products that don’t contribute to deforestation or labour abuse. But buying an ethically sourced product is not as […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
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14 parasitic worms taken out of woman's eye

The Oregon case is the first known infection by a parasite usually found in cows. A woman from Oregon has become the first person in the world to have been infected by Thelazia gulosa, an eye worm that until now has only ever been found in cows. Yep, eye worms – they’re a thing. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the woman felt an irritation in her left eye. […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
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Ancient bird poo? Tell me moa!

You can learn a lot about an animal from its poo. Even if they’ve been dead for thousands of years. Coporolites are fossilised dung, and DNA barcoding analysis of some has told us more about the diet and lives of some of New Zealands ancient birds. New Zealand was the last large land mass to be colonised by humans, but within 200 years of human arrival, around 40% of all bird species disappeared, including all […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lisa Bailey from Australia's Science Channel
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Sea level rise is accelerating

Satellite data has confirmed global sea levels are rising faster each year. Steve Nerem and collegaues from the University of Colorado Boulder analysed 25 years of satellite data and found that the rate of acceleration is about 0.08mm per year. At this rate, by the end of the century it could mean sea level rising by 1cm a year. Sea levels go up as water either warms up and expands, or more water enters the oceans […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lisa Bailey from Australia's Science Channel
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'Thermal dots' open new frontier for nanoparticles

Physicists have overcome a fundamental physical problem with ultra-small nanoparticles to develop the smallest temperature sensor ever. The researchers have dubbed their new creation a “thermal dot” that has the potential to revolutionise display technologies, security inks, and bio-imaging. The thermal dots are a so-called “upconverting nanoparticles” that are able to absorb low-energy photons from infrared light – or heat – and emit higher-energy photons, such as visible light. But the tricky problem with this, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lauren Fuge from Australia's Science Channel

All-female Amazon molly is asexual and thriving

The rare fish is active, travels widely and, according to a recent study, is in remarkably good health. The Amazon molly is clearly thriving despite opting for a life without sex. The finding by a team from Washington University St Louis is surprising given that asexual reproduction is assumed to cause genomes to decay. However, when the researchers sequenced the Amazon molly’s genome they found few harmful mutations, little genetic decay and a high degree […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Bill Condie from Australia's Science Channel
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Soil proves rich source of new antibiotics

A new class of powerful antibiotics has been discovered in soil samples, which will soon provide doctors with much-needed new weapons to combat drug-resistant infections. The new class of antibiotics, called malactins, has also revived interest in the medical uses of so called “natural products” made by bacteria – historically where most clinically useful antibiotics have been found. But the strategy of drawing solutions from bacteria themselves has been largely abandoned during the past few […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel

Spiders win gold in fastest spin competition

It’s the result we’ve all been waiting for – the gold medal for Fastest Leg-driven Turning Maneuver Of Any Terrestrial Animal (aka fastest spin) goes to the spider family Selenopidae. Researchers have just described how these creepy crawlies (commonly known as flattie spiders or wall spiders, and found in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Australia) can turn to strike their prey at speeds of up to 3000 degrees per second. In the literal blink of […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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Measles vaccine has wider mortality benefits

Researchers find that timely administration of the measles vaccine after DTP3 vaccination can decrease mortality by up to 28 per cent, showing that the vaccine has profound effects beyond preventing measles. This is the largest study to date into a low or middle-income country. The researchers were particularly interested in the order in which childhood vaccines are given, and that the vaccination courses are fully completed. It was already known that child mortality is lower […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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