Latest Science


The amazing dragon of Lingwu

Superfamily spread out across the supercontinent. When dinosaurs roamed the Earth, diplodocoids roamed more widely that previously thought, according to a new study. International researchers now believe members of the superfamily of sauropod dinosaurs were distributed right across the supercontinent Pangaea, the giant landmass that included all the present continents, challenging conventional views on the origin and dispersal of diplodocoids and other neosauropods. In a paper published in Nature Communications they report a new diplodocoid […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Get ready for the longest Lunar Eclipse of the century

It might come with apocalyptic predictions, but no, we aren’t all going to die. The majestic sight of the Full Moon turning “Blood Red” as the Earth passes directly between it and the Sun is a reminder that we live in a dynamic Universe with moving celestial bodies. On the 27th – 28th July it is a wonderful opportunity that huge swaths of Australia, India, Asia, Africa and the Middle East can enjoy. Especially as […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Alan Duffy from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

The search for the signature of life on Europa might have just gotten easier

Differences in the radiation hitting Jupiter’s moon may mean we literally only need to scratch the surface. Whether it’s on an exoplanet, or within our own solar system, recent research is revealing more and more potential for life to exist off Earth. One of the key places to look is Jupiter’s moon Europa. Below its thick crust of ice is a liquid ocean where life could potentially thrive. And if life exists, it should leave […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Ebola may have helped bats resist infection

Study suggests they integrated into the Myotis genome 18 million years ago. You don’t read a lot of good things about Ebola, but it appears the Myotis or mouse-eared bat may have the deadly virus to thank for reducing its susceptibility to viral infection. Researchers from Georgia State University in the US believe that genes encoding viral proteins 35 (VP35s) produced by the Ebola and Marburg viruses integrated into the genomes of Myotis bats around […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

German astronaut makes surprise guest appearance from space at Kraftwerk concert

German astronaut Alexander Gerst appeared live from the ISS to help Kraftwerk play SpaceLab. When 7500 people crammed into Stuttgart’s Schlossplatz for legendary electronica group Kraftwerk’s appearance at the Jazz Open Festival, they had no idea their night was about to hit new heights. Partway through the concert German ESA Astronaut Alexander Gerst made a surprise appearance live from the International Space Station, where he is living and working until mid-December. Using a tablet specially […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Alternative therapies double chances of cancer death

Refusing to accept conventional medical treatments is a really bad idea. People diagnosed with cancer have a range of treatment options. However new research has found that those who choose alternative therapies at the expense of conventional medical practices put themselves at much higher risk. The study conducted by the Yale School of Medicine found that alternative therapies doubled the risk of dying. Use of complementary medicine is growing. These therapies, which lack scientific evidence […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel

Rising global meat consumption could spell trouble

A review of research has revealed some of the challenges we face from a meat-centred diet. From rising disease to environmental devastation and carbon emissions, our love of meat could spell trouble in the future, scientists warn. In a review published in the journal Science, a group of researchers from the University of Oxford have discussed the effects of meat consumption around the world on our health, biodiversity loss and carbon emissions, and examined the […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Great Barrier Reef not recovering like it used to

But there is hope if we act now, scientists say. The Great Barrier Reef is not bouncing back from disturbances like it used to, with average coral recovery rates declining sixfold in the 18 years up to 2010. It’s the first time a decline of this magnitude has been identified in coral reefs, but scientists say better local management could turn things around. A team from the University of Queensland’s ARC Centre of Excellence for […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Your first memory may have never happened

Survey finds 40% of people’s first memories may be fictional. Think back to your first memory. Maybe it’s sitting in a pram, or the house where your parents lived. There’s a good chance that memory may be fictional, according to the findings of a new survey. The study, conducted by researchers from City University of London, the University of Bradford and Nottingham Trent University found that nearly 40% of what people claim to be their […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

King of the Planets now King of the Moons

Twelve new moons of Jupiter – including one ‘oddball’ on a collision course. A treasure trove of a dozen newly discovered moons of Jupiter has been confirmed, taking the total to 79. The largest planet in the Solar System is now also the one with the most moons, for now. Of those dozen new moons, eleven behave in a somewhat normal way. One, however, has a very different path leading the researchers to describe it […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Alan Duffy from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Australian company brings poo testing to the masses

Business looks to access new understanding of our microbiome’s effects on health. A smear of poo from your toilet paper is all you need to take advantage of a new venture, the first to offer metagenomic testing direct to the public.  The Brisbane-based company Microba, founded by University of Queensland researchers Philip Hugenholtz and Gene Tyson, and with Australian science luminary Ian Frazer as its director, hopes its test will be the new gold standard […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Dyani Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Kelp’s record journey has an environmental downside

Antarctic ecosystems could be more vulnerable than suspected to global warming. The unexpected discovery of southern bull kelp on an Antarctic beach has revealed how vulnerable Antarctica is to ecological changes driven by climate change and the impacts of pollution. The kelp travelled 20,000 kilometres, passing through what were thought to be impenetrable polar currents and winds, to complete the longest known biological rafting event ever recorded. However, ocean modelling by Australian scientists trying to […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Does CRISPR need to be sharper?

Gene editing technique may be less accurate than hoped The gene editing technique CRISPR-Cas9 has been widely hailed as a promising therapeutic strategy for diseases such as cancer, HIV, haemophilia and sickle cell disease. However, questions are now being raised after a UK study found that it appears to edit DNA near the genes being targeted as well as the genes themselves. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute looked at mouse and human cells and […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel

Thawing permafrost offers climate clues

Study links microbiomes to greenhouse gases. We may soon have a clearer idea of how and by how much thawing permafrost will increase global warming over the next century. An international team led by the University of Queensland has studied the microorganisms involved in permafrost carbon degradation and linked changing microbial communities and biogeochemistry to the rise of greenhouse gas emissions. That’s a first and it’s significant given that, as PhD student Caitlin Singleton notes, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Don’t challenge these guys to a chilli eating competition

They can handle heat that would make us weep (or worse). When it comes to handling heat from the kitchen, it seems the Chinese tree shrew is on another level. Scientists from Kunming Institute of Zoology have discovered that Tupaia belangeri chinensis remains unaffected by even the hottest of chillies because it has evolved different pain cells. Chillies aren’t naturally a part of its diet, but a plant it does favour – Piper boehmeriaefolium – produces […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Watch the demolition of two historic launch towers at Cape Canaveral

Two historic launch towers at Cape Canaveral have been toppled in a spectacular demolition. With a bang and a crash, the US Air Force has demolished two historic launch towers at Cape Canaveral to make way for redevelopment. Complex 17, one of the oldest launch complexes at the Cape, was the site of 325 launches of Thor and Delta rockets between 1957 and 2011. Those launches included 48 GPS satellites relied upon for navigation today, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

YE5! Single asteroid is actually two locked in an astronomical embrace

An asteroid discovered last year is actually two smaller rocks travelling through space in an intimate embrace. Like two lovers on a lonely journey through space, astronomers have discovered of two asteroids locked in orbit around each other – the astronomical equivalent of holding hands. However, for months astronomers had been watching the near-Earth asteroid 2017 YE5 without realising it was actually two objects, not one. Discovered in December last year, it took three of […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Cosmic neutrinos traced to their source for the first time

The cool ice of Antarctica is now one of the hottest places on Earth for particle physics. A cubic kilometre of Antarctica’s ice sheet has lit up as a ghost-like particle slammed into at nearly the speed of light. The observations made by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, are the first evidence of a source of high-energy particles called neutrinos: an energetic galaxy about four billion light years from Earth. Two […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Alan Duffy from Australia's Science Channel

Iceman reveals the real paleo diet

Italian researchers delve into a 5,000-year-old man to see what he had for dinner. For the first time ever, we’ve been given an insight into the last meal of a 5000-year old caveman – and if you thought you had too much fat in your diet, chances are it is nothing like this guy. Ötzi was discovered in 1991 by hikers in the eastern Italian Alps, having been frozen for 5300 years like a forgotten […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel

Kip Thorne, and why he kept his LIGO scoop under wraps for months

Gravitational waves, wormholes and time travelling to kill your grandfather. The Nobel Prize winner spoke exclusively to Andrew Masterson. Although not a property exclusive to human beings, the ability to delay gratification is nevertheless a foundational characteristic of our species – the smart members of it, anyway. And Kip Thorne, Feynman professor emeritus at the California Institute of Technology in the US, is very smart indeed. As a highly respected theoretical physicist, and joint founder […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andrew Masterson from Australia's Science Channel

New chip can produce fuel and oxygen in space

A team have created a way to create hydrogen and oxygen in space by flinging their apparatus up and down a giant tube. As we begin to move out towards the stars, we’re going to need to be able to make hydrogen to use as energy for transportation, electrical power and oxygen generation. There are even ideas that we could produce it on the moon as a sort of solar-system-service-station to refuel spacecraft on their […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel

Two-thirds of Gippsland koalas have chlamydia

Study methodology allows for testing in the wild. There’s good news, bad news and good news from a recent scientific study of koalas in the South Gippsland area of Victoria. For the koalas, the good news is that koala retrovirus subgroup A is less common than feared. The bad news is that nearly two-thirds of them have chlamydia, the other disease contributing to falling koala numbers. For the researchers, the good news is the success […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Baby’s cry has sound of the future

Our voice pitch is determined before we speak. When a baby cries it’s telling you more than that there’s a problem requiring your immediate attention. According to French and British researchers, the pitch of that cry gives you a pretty good idea what your child is going to sound like later in life. Their longitudinal study found that the pitch of a baby’s cry at four months of age predicts the pitch of their speech utterances […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

Sleep in a hot dorm? Don’t even think about it

Study shows even the young and fit suffer cognitive decline in the heat. Living in a hot dorm in a heatwave is more than just an unpleasant short-term problem. US researchers have discovered it can also have detrimental cognitive effects which, they say, highlights the need to design buildings that can cope with extreme heat in a world that’s getting hotter. The study of students in their late teens and early 20s was the first to […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

The spooky sounds of Saturn

Cassini captured haunting sounds from the plasma waves moving around Saturn, its rings, and Enceladus. NASA’s Saturn-studying satellite Cassini is still delivering surprises a year after its demise. A week after revealing complex organic molecules on Enceladus, researchers have now released spooky sounds captured from around Saturn just 2 weeks before Cassini’s death plunge into the planet. The sounds are created by surprisingly powerful and dynamic plasma waves moving from Saturn to its rings and […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
Topics -

1 42 43 44 45 46 67