Latest Science


My beautiful deadly city - when home makes you sick

What do you do when you love your hometown – but it could be killing you? That is the dilemma for the residents of the arctic mining city of Norilsk in Russia’s central north. Norilsk is the world’s northernmost city with more than 100,000 inhabitants and second largest city after Mumansk inside the Arctic Circle. It is also one of the most polluted cities anywhere in the world. Despite that many residents are still proud to […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel

Death of a beetle - the battle for life under the microscope

NEX is the winner of the 2017 SCINEMA Award for Technical Merit. It is a ‘visually stunning film illuminating the minute battles of nature from the micro to macro scale as a rhinoceros beetle, attacked by a fungus, struggles between life and death’. It charts the destructive course of a fungus that invades the body of a rhinoceros beetle, eventually killing it. “The basic idea was to show something that is actually horrible in a very […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel

In search of the perfect pig - happy AND tasty

Pork.0 is an inspiring and touching short documentary that follows Carl Blake II who is using genetics to fight back against the factory farming of pork that has damaged the environment, produced bland meat and led to miserable lives for farmed pigs. Blake, a former computer engineer began his quest after a harrowing car accident he very nearly didn’t survive. He has already attracted attention by producing some of the tastiest and happiest pigs in […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel

Where are the snows of yesteryear?

The ice and snow of the Rocky Mountains is rapidly vanishing due to climate change. A study in 2016 suggested that smaller snowfalls and shrinking glaciers and other icy terrain could lead to shortage of water supplies. The 1,000-year-old Arikaree Glacier in Colorado, for example, has been thinning by about 1 metre a year for the past 15 years and will disappear completely in 25 years. Most scientists believe the process is now irreversible. This film […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel

Champagne – and the importance of bubbles

Does anything herald the imminent arrival of a good time more than the pop of a champagne cork? While champagne may be the preferred tipple for celebrating another rotation around the Sun, the tongue-tingling bubbles in this party elixir do more than get you in a dancing mood. But it’s not as straightforward as you may think. Critics will often commend fancy bottles of champagne for the fine, delicate bubbles that rise from the glass. […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andy Stapleton from Australia's Science Channel

2018 shapes up to be a huge year in physics and astronomy

As we get ready to say goodbye to 2017 let’s take a look at 2018, which is shaping up to be another year of great discoveries. Riding the gravitational wave After a spectacularly successful observing run, the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors have shut down for upgrades that will make them more sensitive. When they are switched back on in late 2018 they will be able to detect gravitational wave events further out in […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: David Gozzard from The International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research
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The ancient water supply systems of Iran

For thousands of years Persians have channeled water from deep underground aquifers to the surface for drinking and agriculture using an ingenious system of channels. The aqueduct in the central Iranian city of Yazd is a fine example of the ancient technology, which still has the ability to provide water in this harsh arid climate. But this UNESCO heritage site is rotting away thanks to bureaucracy, corruption and neglect. This fascinating film explores the complex […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel

A voice from the future – what 2018 may have in store for STEM

An interesting quirk of science is that we tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run. While it may be difficult to know what lies around the corner, there are a number of dedicated professionals who spend their time trying to work out what the future may hold. Robert Hickson is a Strategist and “Futurist” who specialises in providing scientific and strategic advice […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andy Stapleton from Australia's Science Channel

Operation IceBridge – Beauty from the ends of the world

NASA’s Operation IceBridge has been flying over Antarctica to measure changes in land and sea ice at the bottom of the world for the past nine years. The airborne survey is designed to give unprecedented 3D views of Earth’s polar ice, ice sheets, ice shelves and sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic. Data collected will help scientists bridge the gap in polar observations between NASA’s Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), which operated […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel
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Can Reindeer fly? Answers for inquisitive minds this Christmas

It’s that magical time of the year again, when Mariah Carey’s “All I want for Christmas” is bellowed throughout shopping malls all over the country. A time when friends and family come together to share in the experience of overindulgence. And, a time where inquisitive little minds start questioning the cute fairly tales told to them by well-meaning adults desperately trying to keep the magic of Christmas alive. How do Reindeer fly? How does Santa […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andy Stapleton
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Chimps and six year olds will pay to see sweet justice served

There’s a reason that a 10 minute remix of Tyrion slapping Joffrey from Game of Thrones has racked up millions of views on youtube.  People get pleasure from watching others receive punishment for wrongdoings. via GIPHY   When does this kick in?  A study this week in Nature Human Behaviour carried out an experiment with 4 to 6 year olds to find out at what point humans develop this desire to see justice served, and […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lisa Bailey from Australia's Science Channel
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Robotic return trip to comet and drone exploration of Titan, are NASA finalists for future missions

A return trip to a comet to pick up samples and a drone-like rotorcraft that would explore potential landing sites on Saturn’s largest moon, Titan are the two finalist concepts in NASA’s competition for a robotic mission in the mid-2020s. The concepts were chosen from 12 proposals submitted in April. “This is a giant leap forward in developing our next bold mission of science discovery,” Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors
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A salad a day keeps memory okay

A recipe for a good memory might be anything with lots of leafy vegetables. An observational study from the US found that people who regularly eat their greens had a slower decline of memory and thinking skills compared to people who never or rarely eat these types of veggies. The difference was so great, the salad-lovers were the equivalent of 11 years younger in age. “Adding a daily serving of green, leafy vegetables to your […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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The water within Mars

The reason Earth has water and Mars is a desert may be underfoot. Tens of kilometres under the barren, dried out surface of Mars may exist the water that astronomers have long suspected it should contain but somehow lost, turning it into a lifeless desert while Earth retained its oceans and allowed life to evolve. Recent discoveries by robotic explorers and orbiters of Mars have revealed that the red planet was once blue like Earth, […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Alan Duffy from Australia's Science Channel
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The Check Up - prosthetics, cosmetics, and anaesthetics

The Check Up is a weekly feature highlighting some of the best, most fascinating, most important, or simply unmissable health, medical, and human stories from around the web. This is a supersized version to get you through the holidays – happy reading! ‘Smart’ prosthetic limbs Let’s kick off by introducing you to Darren Wilson. He lost both his legs in a motorcycle accident, but he’s since undergone a procedure called osseointegration, where an implant is put directly into […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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Cosmic rays might lead to cloudy days - but claims of affecting climate change look exaggerated

Thousands of light years away a star meets its end, exploding as a supernova. Cosmic rays spew out of this cataclysmic event, streaming across the universe unimpeded and unchecked. And when they reach Earth, according to Danish researchers, they might cause clouds to form. However, claims that these clouds are significant factors in climate change are exaggerated, say other scientists. Cosmic rays are streams of high-energy particles released from stars, supernovae, and the corona of […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel

Decorator crabs get into the Christmas spirit for science

In an experiment that appears to be designed for Instagram, scientists have given some decorator crabs Christmas-coloured pom poms to investigate what drives their decorating behaviour. There are around 900 species of decorator crabs, named for their penchant to cover themselves in adornments. Some species will grab whatever seems to be available, while some will decorate themselves with particularly nasty smelling or horrible tasting items as a form of chemical camouflage, for example toxic seaweed […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lisa Bailey from Australia's Science Channel
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Surfing citizen scientists monitor ocean pollution

Surfers around Sydney’s Northern Beaches have been working with scientists from the Clean Ocean Foundation to develop a citizen science toolkit to monitor wastewater outflows from a local water treatment plant. When there’s a heavy rainfall, the water treatment plant at Warriewood can’t cope with the influx of stormwater, and Sydney Water which operate the plant discharge partially treated water into the ocean, near a popular surf spot. By involving Surfrider Northern Beaches, scientists have […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Lisa Bailey from Australia's Science Channel
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High-tech forensics confirm oral history of Aboriginal massacre

For almost a century, the people of the Kutjungka region of WA have passed on the testimony of massacres of their ancestors at Sturt Creek. Now Flinders University researchers have found scientific evidence that indicates bodies of Aboriginal victims in the southeast Kimberley region were frequently incinerated following the event. Working with oral testimony of the descent group, which originated from a sole adult survivor of the massacre, archaeological surveys defined two distinct sites containing thousands […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: News Desk from Flinders University
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The poor are wiser than the rich, research suggests

If you’ve ever thought that rich people are jerks, well the latest research might just agree with you – if you read between the diplomatic and objective scientific lines. Two studies just out from the US provide insight into the relationship between wealth and emotions. It looks like having less money is associated with greater wisdom and more positive feelings about relationships and other people. The first study, regarding social class and wise reasoning, used […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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What science says about giving the perfect gift this Christmas

You’ve spent months agonising over the perfect gift. And now, the moment of truth is here and all eyes are on the receiver. Buying gifts at Christmas needn’t be a gamble. There are some tried and science-tested approaches to ensure that you don’t have to locate the receipt on boxing day. Experiences vs. things Scientists from the University of Toronto have found that giving an experience rather than a material item builds a stronger relationship […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Andy Stapleton from Australia's Science Channel
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Happy dolphin population deserves protection in Coffin Bay

When dolphins are in a safe, bountiful environment, they don’t venture far – despite having the capability to range over vast ocean distances. And within such areas, we need to ensure that dolphin populations remain protected and secure, with good management. Flinders University researchers have performed detailed studies of an especially large dolphin population in Coffin Bay, at the foot of South Australia’s Eyre Peninsula, and found that when dolphins find such a patch of […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: News Desk from Flinders University
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Kangaroo-sized flying turkey once roamed Australia

A giant, flying turkey as tall as a kangaroo is among five extinct large megapode birds discovered by palaentologists at Flinders University. All five birds were chunky relatives of today’s Malleefowl and Brush-turkeys, but the giant brush-turkey Progura gallinacea, which was as tall as a grey kangaroo, soars above the others. After carefully comparing megapode fossils from Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia and Western Australia, the researchers have concluded that the remains belong to five different […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: News Desk from Flinders University
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The best science fiction on screen in 2017

It’s been the sort of year where escapism doesn’t have a long shelf life, so this list is a murderer’s row of ‘that movie came out just this year? Feels like a lifetime ago!’ On the flipside, remembering these great films will give you all sorts of warm and fuzzy feelings. So here they are, the best science fiction your eyes and ears could get in 2017, in no particular order. And I can’t guarantee […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: Casey Harrigan from Australia's Science Channel
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Flirty finches live up to their name

Galápagos Islands finches that helped Charles Darwin develop his theory of natural selection are showing clear signs of further evolutionary development. The latest study by researchers from the Flinders University Bird Lab has further shown that the birds commonly known as Darwin’s finches are the world’s fastest-evolving vertebrates, with their appearance and behaviour quickly adapting to rapidly changing environments. Researchers Dr Katharina Peters and Professor Sonia Kleindorfer, from the Research Centre for Animal Behaviour at […] See more

Published 2 years ago. Author: News Desk from Flinders University
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