Latest Science


How the moon landing changed the world

50 years after the moon landing, four experts tell us how the historic event changed the world. 50 years ago Neil Armstrong stepped onto the moon and uttered those famous words “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”. And what a giant leap it has been. The moon landing transformed the way we understand our own planet, as well as providing technology we use every day. But not only did it […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel
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Alex the Astronaut goes behind the scenes of Apollo 11

Alex the Astronaut spoke to the director of the new Apollo 11 documentary and got the inside scoop about the astronauts and the historic space mission. As a space nerd, speaking to people who have landed on the moon is probably a normal person’s version of meeting Beyoncé and the Yankees on the same day. For Todd Douglas Miller, not only did he get to meet one of his heroes, Michael Collins, he also got […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Alex The Astronaut from Australia's Science Channel
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Alan Duffy on what it took to get humans to the Moon

The Royal Institution of Australia’s Lead Scientist Alan Duffy reflects on the massive effort required to get humans to the Moon during the Apollo missions. From the incredible engineering of the rocket, to over 400,000 people all working towards a single goal. The Apollo missions represent one of humanity’s greatest achievements. Related The strange story of Neil Armstrong’s bag After 50 years, Apollo’s moon rocks still have much to give Australia’s 60,000 years of space […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: from Australia's Science Channel
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Do aliens exist? Brian Cox explains

Aliens are a popular trope in Hollywood movies. They’re often the villains in horror movies, painted as dangerous, hyper-intelligent life forms. But how accurate are these portrayals? Brian Cox tells us all about alien life, and what scientists suggest they’d look like. Spoiler alert – they probably don’t fly spaceships. Related The aliens might be dead anyway We just can’t wait to meet those aliens Aliens From Outer Space See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: from Australia's Science Channel
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From Apollo to Pulsars: Parkes still dishing out the discoveries

The CSIRO’s Parkes Telescope was crucial in bringing the 1969 moon landing to televisions back here on Earth. But apart from its Moon fame, Parkes has played a part in some of the biggest scientific discoveries in recent times from its place on Wiradjuri land. And now, 50 years on, Parkes is still dishing out discoveries. While the technology behind the telescope has become smaller, the amount of data has become bigger, leading the Parkes […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: from Australia's Science Channel
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Brian Cox on black holes

In the past few years, we’ve entered a new age of astronomy – now we can watch black holes collide, and see the aftermath of these collisions. Astrophysics legend Brian Cox talks us through what happens during these cataclysmic collisions and what might just happen to the black holes when the Milky Way collides with Andromeda. Related Astronomers react to the first images of a black hole Colliding Black Holes In Class With… Brian Cox See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: from Australia's Science Channel
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The strange story of Neil Armstrong’s bag

Forget designer handbags, this story of a very expensive, one-of-a-kind bag used on the moon by Neil Armstrong is mired in controversy. In July 2017 famed auction house Sotheby’s auctioned a unique piece of space history. The prices were expected to reach well over $4 million, but ultimately the gavel fell at “just” $1.8 million. NASA was none too pleased about the sale. But what this object is, and how it came to be on […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Ben Lewis from Australia's Science Channel
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Improved vision for facial recognition

Scientists have enhanced a facial recognition algorithm that improves the odds of identifying a person in difficult environments. Scientists from DST have improved facial recognition technology, which will enhance the odds of identifying someone in adverse environments such as across a distant carpark and in dark alleys. Sau Yee Yiu and Dmitri Kamenetsky are both members of DST’s biometrics research team who worked on the new algorithm. “Biometrics is all about recognising people,” Kamenetsky explains. […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Defence Science and Technology Group from Defence Science and Technology Group

After 50 years, Apollo’s moon rocks still have much to give

While some moon rocks are on public display – including one in Australia that you can touch – NASA has a secret stash yet to be opened. The world may be fast approaching the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo 11’s 1969 flight to the moon, but the samples brought back by it and NASA’s five subsequent landings remain fresh and exciting, scientists say. The six missions brought back 381 kilograms of material, but NASA has been […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Richard Lovett from Australia's Science Channel
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Are sugary drinks giving you cancer?

Researchers have found that sugary drinks may increase our cancer risk, adding to the long list of reasons why they’re bad for us. Drinking sugary drinks such as soft drinks and fruit juices may increase your cancer risk, French researchers say. The study is bad news for people drinking a can of soft drink or a glass of juice each day. It found that as little as a 100 mL per day increase in sugary […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Lyndal Byford from Australian Science Media Centre
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Australia's 60,000 years of space history

From the Dreamtime to 2019, Australia has a rich history in space. Discover Australia’s incredible history in helping understand our place in the universe. From the beginning of Indigenous astronomy to today, Australia has always played a leading role in space. In 1947 the Woomera Test Range was established to support rocket development and launches. Both the British and European efforts made use of the site. Woomera also saw the launch of WRESAT1, Australia’s first […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: from Australia's Science Channel
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Lisa Harvey-Smith: Smashing galaxies and gender stereotypes

Australia’s first Women in STEM Ambassador discusses the future of astrophysics, the importance of science communication, and boosting STEM diversity. Not many people have the skill to draw an entire room full of everyday Australians – scientists, science-enthusiasts and the science-illiterate alike – to a two-hour talk on complex astrophysics. Lisa Harvey-Smith did this in theatres around Australia for the launch of her book When Galaxies Collide and managed to keep the audience on the […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Bianca Le from Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering

Emoji aren't ruining language: they're a natural substitute for gesture 🔥🔥🔥

Emoji aren’t ruining language – in fact the way we use emoji is similar to the way we use gestures in speech. We’re much more likely to be hanging out on social media than at the watercooler these days. But just because we’re no longer face-to-face when we chat, doesn’t mean our communication is completely disembodied. Over the last three decades, psychologists, linguists, and anthropologists, along with researchers from other traditions, have come together to […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Lauren Gawne from La Trobe University
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Very early Earth had continents that have disappeared completely

A new model of Earth’s ancient rocks suggests that there may have been continents as far back as 4 billion years, which have now disappeared without a trace. Scientists have found that the Earth’s continental crust may have been thicker, much earlier than current models suggest, with continents possibly present as far back as four billion years. Derrick Hasterok and Matthew Gard from the University of Adelaide, compiled 75,800 geochemical samples from igneous rocks (such […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: University of Adelaide Newsroom from The University of Adelaide
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Artificial light might make it harder to find Nemo

It might be harder to find Nemo if artificial light from our coastlines continues to impact fish reproduction rates. Artificial light has the potential to reduce the reproductive fitness of fish that inhabit reefs near populated shorelines, an Australian study has found. When researchers from Flinders University exposed 10 breeding pairs of clownfish (Amphiprion ocellari) – of Finding Nemo fame – to different light conditions, they found starkly different results. Presence of artificial light led […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Amelia Nichele from Flinders University
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How Kris went from environmental scientist to COO of a gas company

An industry career as an environmental scientist can combine a love for the outdoors as well as meaningful community engagement work. Dr Kris Waddington was a beach-loving country kid who studied marine biology. These days you’ll find him coordinating environmental issues and community engagement as Chief Operating Officer for the successful Australian oil and gas exploration and production company Buru Energy. How did you get to where you are now? I grew up on the […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Nick Carne from Australia's Science Channel

Using virtual reality could make you a better person in real life

Our virtual avatars could begin to change and take over our usual identities, shaping our behaviour in the real world. If you’ve ever participated in a virtual reality (VR) experience, you might have found yourself navigating the virtual world as an avatar. If you haven’t, you probably recognise the experience from its portrayal in film and on television. Popular media has brought us characters like Jake Sully in Avatar, Wade Watts in Ready Player One, […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Thuong Hoang from Deakin University

How Australian scientists are helping eliminate the scourge of chemical weapons

Australian researchers are developing new tools to assist investigators track down and eliminate chemical weapons around the world. Since the First World War when more than 90,000 soldiers suffered agonizing deaths, chemical weapons have been abhorred by most countries. Exposure to chlorine, phosgene, mustard gas and other chemical agents left nearly a million people with debilitating injuries – an unnecessarily cruel and unfair method of warfare. However, despite almost universal condemnation, the threat of chemical […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Defence Science and Technology Group from Defence Science and Technology Group

We could breed cows to make their farts and burps less damaging

The climate impact of cow farts and burps could be reduced, as an international team show that it is possible to breed cows that produce less methane. An international team of researchers have looked at the genetic makeup of cows in order to reduce the amount of methane they emit. Published in the journal Science Advances, the researchers showed that the genetics of an individual cow strongly influenced the make-up of the microorganisms in its […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: University of Adelaide Newsroom from The University of Adelaide
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Shhh! Don't wake the microbes - they could create carbon bombs

Disturbing ancient carbon stores buried deep in coastal ecosystems can trigger the release of destructive greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Coastal ecosystems are more fragile than previously thought, say Australian researchers. These ecosystems, which are more effective than trees at capturing carbon,  could in fact contribute to global warming if the ‘blue‘ carbon that’s been long stored away in mudflats and wetlands is disturbed. Release of carbon disastrous for the environment Peter Macreadie, lead researcher […] See more

Published 1 month ago. Author: Deakin Newsroom from Deakin University
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Just how healthy are Aussie pre-teens?

Researchers have found that while Aussie pre-teens are generally pretty healthy, their snacking, physical activity and sleep habits could be improved. A one-off health check of 1,800 Australian children has provided a snapshot of the health of Aussie kids aged 11 to 12 years. The series of studies, known as the Child Health CheckPoint, looked at everything from weight and cholesterol to lung function, hearing and sleep, to see just how healthy Aussie pre-teens are. […] See more

Published 2 months ago. Author: Olivia Henry from Australian Science Media Centre
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Meet Sofia: a 67-year-old Grandma who plays Pokémon Go

More than just a game, Pokémon Go is bringing older generations closer to their urban communities. Over the first weeks of July 2016, a strange phenomenon started to unfold in many parts of the world. A mobile game went viral. Streets in Barcelona, Melbourne, Singapore and New York began to fill with hordes digital wayfaring as part of the augmented reality (AR) game, Pokémon Go. The game popularised the digital overlay technique of AR, in […] See more

Published 2 months ago. Author: Larissa Hjorth from RMIT University

The Night King reigns in Australia

The Night King might have been killed off in Game of Thrones, but his legacy continues to live on as a newly named bee fly. Remember the leader of the White Walkers who killed much-loved characters and caused a whole lot of heartbreak across the world? Well, PhD student and hardcore Game of Thrones fan, Xuankun Li, decided to name a new species of bee fly after him. The bee fly, Paramonovius nightking, was named after […] See more

Published 2 months ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Cosmos Magazine
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Jane Goodall on the Future

Conservation hero and living legend Jane Goodall shares her thoughts on the future of the planet in this exclusive video. “It’s you young people who enable me to carry on, who give me hope for the future.” The future of the planet will depend how we manage our impact. Our actions now and tomorrow will be vital for a sustainable future. Programs like Jane’s Roots and Shoots are helping tomorrows leaders make an impact around […] See more

Published 2 months ago. Author: from Australia's Science Channel
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We need to talk about how disruptive period pain is

The reality is that period pain is impacting women at school, uni and work, and we really need to talk about it. Menstrual symptoms including pain, heavy bleeding and low mood may be linked to nearly nine days of lost productivity per woman every year, according to a new study published in the British Medical Journal this week. The researchers evaluated lost productivity associated with menstrual symptoms, as measured by time off from work or […] See more

Published 2 months ago. Author: Australia's Science Channel Editors from Australia's Science Channel
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